Article Text

PDF
Adverse events experienced while transferring the critically ill patient from the emergency department to the intensive care unit
  1. L Gillman1,
  2. G Leslie2,
  3. T Williams3,
  4. K Fawcett4,
  5. R Bell4,
  6. V McGibbon5
  1. 1Royal Perth Hospital and Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  2. 2Edith Cowan University and Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  3. 3Centre for Nursing Evidence Based Practice, Education & Research, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  4. 4Emergency Department, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  5. 5Intensive Care Unit, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  1. Correspondence to:
 L Gillman
 Royal Perth Hospital and Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA 6001, Australia;Lucia.gillman{at}health.wa.gov.au

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the incidence and nature of adverse events and delay to patient transfer from emergency department to intensive care unit (ICU) in a metropolitan tertiary hospital.

Method: A 6-month prospective observational study in conjunction with a retrospective chart audit on all emergency department patients admitted to ICU, including those admitted via theatre or after a computed tomography scan.

Results: Equipment problems was the most common adverse event occurring in 9% of patient transfers (n = 290). Hypothermia events occurred in 7% of transfers, cardiovascular events in 6% of patient transfers, delays to transfer >20 min occurred in 38% of the prospectively audited cases, with 14% waiting >1 h. One patient was found to have an incorrect patient identification band during a preoperative check.

Conclusions: This study generally reported lower rates of adverse events than noted in previous studies involving critically ill transfers. The most significant finding was the application of an incorrect patient identification band and has prompted a review of practice. The establishment of benchmark indicators for adverse events and delays in transfer will be useful for future audits.

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Funding: This project has been supported partly by a New Investigators Grant from the Australian College of Critical Care Nurses.

  • Competing interests: None.

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Linked Articles

  • Primary Survey
    Ian Maconochie