Article Text

PDF
Ipsilateral hemispheric ischaemic hypoxic changes during central line placement: a video-electroencephalogram correlate
  1. N K Sethi1,
  2. J Torgovnick2,
  3. P K Sethi3,
  4. E Arsura4
  1. 1
    Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Department of Neurology, NYP-Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, USA
  2. 2
    Department of Neurology, Saint Vincent’s Hospital and Medical Centers, New York, USA
  3. 3
    Department of Neurology, Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi, India
  4. 4
    Department of Medicine, Saint Vincent’s Hospital and Medical Center, New York, USA
  1. Dr N K Sethi, Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Department of Neurology, NYP-Weill Cornell Medical Center, 525 East 68th Street, York Avenue, New York, NY 10021, USA; sethinitinmd{at}hotmail.com

Abstract

When venous access is needed for intravenous fluids or antibiotics and a peripheral site is unavailable or not suitable, a central line is placed either in the neck or the groin. Complications have been reported during central line placement including (but not limited to) pneumothorax, haemothorax, arrhythmias, air embolism and introduction of infection. The case history is reported of a patient who developed ipsilateral hemispheric ischaemic hypoxic changes during central line placement. This was represented on the surface electroencephalogram by ipsilateral hemispheric voltage attenuation.

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Competing interests: None.

  • Patient consent: Obtained from the patient’s relative.

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.