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Basic life support skill retention of medical interns and the effect of clinical experience of cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  1. Ji Ung Na,
  2. Min Seob Sim,
  3. Ik Joon Jo,
  4. Hyoung Gon Song,
  5. Keun Jeong Song
  1. Department of Emergency Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
  1. Correspondence to Professor Min Seob Sim, Department of Emergency Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan, University School of Medicine, 50 Irwon-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710, South Korea; coldco2{at}naver.com

Abstract

Objective To investigate the level of basic life support (BLS) skill retention of medical interns 6 and 12 months after BLS education and analyse the correlation between clinical experience of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and BLS skill retention.

Materials and methods The baseline performance of BLS skills in medical doctors during their internship was tested immediately after the BLS provider course. The subjects were divided into two groups, which were tested using the same method after 6 months or after 12 months. Data on the subjects' CPR experience were collected through CPR records—specifically, the number of CPR experiences and the feedback given by the CPR team leaders. To evaluate BLS skill retention, baseline BLS skill performance was compared with the skill performances measured after 6 or 12 months.

Results Fifty-six subjects were enrolled in the 6 month group and 36 in the 12 month group. For non-compression skills, the points for skills declined from 12 to 6 points in the 6 month group and from 12 to 6 points in the 12 month group and the declines in both groups were statistically significant. For compression skills, in the 12 month group, the hands-off time improved from 9.9 s to 8.7 s, with statistical significance. In the multivariate linear regression test, the number of times feedback was given had a statistical relationship with improvement in hands-off time in the 12 month group (coefficient 0.58, 95% CI 0.12 to 1.05).

Conclusions In medical doctors, the compression skills were well preserved, but the retention of non-compression skills was poor.

  • Life support
  • skill retention
  • healthcare professional
  • resuscitation
  • intensive care

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests None.

  • Patient consent Received.

  • Ethics approval Institutional review board of Samsung Medical Center.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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