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The delivery of the new prehospital emergency medicine curriculum: reflections on a pilot programme in the UK
  1. Carl McQueen1,
  2. Matthew Wyse2
  1. 1Academic Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care, Pain & Resuscitation, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Bordesley Green East, Birmingham, UK
  2. 2Department of Anaesthesia, University Hospital Coventry and Warwick, Coventry, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Carl McQueen, Academic Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care, Pain & Resuscitation, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Bordesley Green East, Birmingham B9 5SS, UK; carl_mcqueen{at}hotmail.com

Abstract

Introduction Pre-hospital Emergency Medicine is a subspecialty of Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesia in the UK, overseen by the Inter-collegiate Board for Training in Pre-hospital Emergency Medicine (IBTPHEM). Organisations delivering General Medical Council (GMC) approved programmes require clear educational governance frameworks to ensure high standards of training. This study outlines the experiences of an Emergency Medicine trainee during an Out of Programme Year with a regional Air Ambulance service in the UK.

Methods Retrospective review of the clinical logbook for an Emergency Medicine trainee during a 12-month attachment with an Air Ambulance service in the UK. IBTPHEM assessment tools were completed to complement the clinical logbook. Clinical experience and the degree of clinical supervision were compared with the standards published by the IBTPHEM.

Results Supervision rates were similar to those in other pilots (17.33%). Clinical workload was comparable with that reported in other organisations. More advanced procedures (eg, conscious sedation/prehospital anaesthetics) were completed than in IBTPHEM pilot programmes. The vast majority of curriculum elements detailed by the IBTPHEM were fulfilled.

Conclusions The experiences of an Emergency Medicine trainee in pilot programme at a regional Air Ambulance in the UK compared favourably with the results of formal pilots of the IBTPHEM programme conducted at other centres. The IBTPHEM assessment tools are appropriately designed and sufficient in number to ensure that fulfilment of the curriculum elements can be recorded and trainee development monitored. Areas for future developments in training and support, notably in curriculum areas regarding the management of obstetric prehospital emergencies, are suggested.

  • Prehospital Care, Doctors In Phc
  • Education, Teaching
  • Education, Methods
  • Education, Assessment
  • Prehospital Care, Helicopter Retrieval

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