Risk factors and outcomes associated with post-traumatic headache after mild traumatic brain injury
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    Abnormal stress response from mTBI often sometimes leads to headaches

    Post traumatic headaches are seriously debilitating. They are often a late symptom in the recovery from brain injury. They tend to be more frequent in female patients with post-concussion syndrome and may be associated with prior migraines. A headache log may help identify environmental underpinnings and shape the treatment plan. I am using a biofeedback protocol here in the Boston area to help down-train the sympathetic-parasympathetic mismatch that is common in TBI. The protocol involves paced breathing and has a growing body of literature in support of treating poor regulation in the autonomic nervous system. Stress of all kinds correlates highly with post-concussion syndrome often prolonging recovery. The protocol I use tends to reduce the impact of the physiological reactivity seen in many TBI and mTBI cases who are still recovering. Sleep hygiene may be a further underlying source of post-concussion syndrome and the heads associated with concussion. I have a few posts on this topic:

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