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BET 2: Poor evidence on whether teaching cognitive debiasing, or cognitive forcing strategies, lead to a reduction in errors attributable to cognition in emergency medicine students or doctors
  1. Govind Oliver1,
  2. Gopal Oliver2,
  3. Rick Body3
  1. 1 Emergency Department, Salford Royal Hospital, Salford, UK
  2. 2 DREEAM: Department of Research and Education in Emergency Medicine, Acute Medicine and Major Trauma, Nottingham University Hospital NHS Trust, Nottingham, UK
  3. 3 Emergency Department, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK

Abstract

A short review was carried out to see if teaching cognitive forcing strategies reduces cognitive error in the practice of emergency medicine. Two relevant papers were found using the described search strategy. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these papers are tabulated. There is currently little evidence that teaching cognitive forcing strategies reduces cognitive error in the practice of emergency medicine.

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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