Responses

PDF
Bet 2: Does intravenous vitamin C improve mortality in patients with severe sepsis?
Compose Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Responses are moderated before posting and publication is at the absolute discretion of BMJ, however they are not peer-reviewed
  • Once published, you will not have the right to remove or edit your response. Removal or editing of responses is at BMJ's absolute discretion
  • If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patient's written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms]
  • By submitting this response you are agreeing to our full [Response terms and requirements]
Publication Date - String

Vertical Tabs

Other responses

Jump to comment:

  • Published on:
    Vitamin C may shorten ICU stay

    The paper by Sheikh and Horner [1] does not properly describe the context for vitamin C.

    Fourteen trials have investigated the effect of vitamin C against post-operative AF (POAF), and significant heterogeneity has appeared between studies carried out in the USA and outside of the USA [2]. In 9 non-US studies vitamin C decreased the incidence of POAF on average by 46% (P<0.00001), but no benefit was seen in 5 US studies.

    In 5 non-US studies, intravenous vitamin C shortened the duration of hospital stay on average by 16% and by 1.47 days (P<0.00001). In 7 non-US studies, oral and intravenous vitamin C shortened the duration of ICU stay on average by 7% (P=0.002)[2]. Thus, there is strong evidence from randomized trials indicating that vitamin C may influence the duration of hospital stay and ICU stay in some contexts. It is not reasonable to restrict to mortality as the only outcome of interest [1], when considering potential effects of vitamin C on ICU patients.

    Sheikh and Horner do not mention that sometimes vitamin C levels are very low in hospital patients. For example, in one study 18 patients with clinical symptoms of scurvy were identified out of 145 consecutive patients [3]. Scurvy has been reported also in modern ICUs [4].

    In their clinical scenario, Sheikh and Horner described a patient with pneumonia, but ignored the association between vitamin C and pneumonia. Vitamin C deficiency increases the risk of pneumonia, and pneumonia d...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.