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No relationship between measures of clinical efficiency and teaching effectiveness for emergency medicine faculty
  1. Tomer Begaz1,
  2. M Chris Decker1,
  3. Robert Treat2,
  4. Matthew Tews1
  1. 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
  2. 2Office of Education Services, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
  1. Correspondence to Tomer Begaz, Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA; tbegaz{at}mcw.edu

Abstract

Objectives Emergency medicine (EM) doctors affiliated with academic institutions experience professional tension between providing excellent, timely care for patients and high-quality bedside instruction for residents and medical students. The goal of this study was to assess the relationship between measures of faculty clinical efficiency and teaching effectiveness.

Methods This was a retrospective review of data from a single academic institution with an annual census of 55 000. Faculty clinical efficiency was measured by two variables: the relative value unit (RVU)/h ratio and average ‘door to discharge’ time. Teaching effectiveness was estimated by determining the average ‘overall teaching’ scores derived from anonymous EM resident and senior medical student evaluations. Relationships were assessed using the Spearman's correlation coefficient.

Results There was no statistically significant relationship (p>0.050) between measures of faculty clinical efficiency and teaching effectiveness.

Conclusion These data replicate previous findings that clinical productivity has no correlation with teaching effectiveness for emergency medicine faculty doctors.

  • Teaching
  • education
  • productivity
  • emergency
  • efficiency
  • clinical assessment
  • education
  • emergency care systems
  • emergency departments
  • emergency care systems
  • efficiency
  • research
  • operational

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests None.

  • Ethics approval This study was conducted with the approval of the institutional review board.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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