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Critical care in the emergency department: acute kidney injury
  1. Patrick A Nee1,2,
  2. David J Bailey3,
  3. Victoria Todd4,
  4. Andrew J Lewington5,
  5. Andrea E Wootten6,
  6. Kevin J Sim7
  1. 1Faculty of Education, Health and Community, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK
  2. 2Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Prescot, Merseyside, UK
  3. 3Department of Emergency Medicine, St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Merseyside, UK
  4. 4Department of Biochemistry, St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Merseyside, UK
  5. 5Department of Nephrology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK
  6. 6Department of Emergency Medicine, Wirral University Hospital, Merseyside, UK
  7. 7Intensive Care Unit, St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Merseyside, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Patrick A Nee, Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Prescot, Merseyside L35 5DR, UK; patrick.nee{at}sthk.nhs.uk

Abstract

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common among emergency department patients admitted to hospital. There is evidence of inadequate management of the condition leading to adverse outcomes. We present an illustrative case of AKI complicating a gastrointestinal disorder in an older adult. We discuss the clinical presentation, assessment and management of AKI with reference to recent consensus guidelines on classification and treatment.

  • x-ray
  • clinical care
  • emergency department
  • intensive care
  • uro-genital

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