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Vasopressin or adrenaline in cardiac resuscitation
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  • Published on:
    Re: Vasopressin or adrenaline in cardiac resuscitation

    Dear Editor

    I agree with Dr Lockers concerns regarding the publication of BETS in a peer reviewed journal. BETS are useful for introducing people to the theory of literature searching, and appraisal of published evidence, ideal skills for SPR's working towards their clinical topic review. However this does not necessarily warrant their publication in a peer reviewed journal. They occupy valuable space within a journal...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Vasopressin - the continuing evidence.

    Dear Editor

    On the 8th of this month, the large mutlicentre European Resuscitation Council study comparing the effects of adrenaline and vasopressin in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was published. This was a mutlicentre study conducted between 1999 and 2002 in Austria, Germany and Switzerland. Patients with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation and intravenous vasopressor the...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Vasopressin and adrenaline in cardiac resuscitation - the BET.
    • Kerstin Hogg, Clinical Research Fellow
    • Other Contributors:
      • Reddy Mahu, Ian Crawford

    Dear Editor

    We read with interest the comments on our best evidence topic review on Vasopressin or adrenaline in cardiac resuscitation and are happy to explain the process involved in producing the BET.

    This literature search was first conducted in March 2002. Our initial and specific question was:
    Is vasopressin more effective than adrenaline in achieving return of circulation and longte...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Vasopressin or adrenaline in cardiac resuscitation

    Dear Editor

    The best evidence topic report (BET) by Hogg and Mahu [1] raises a number of concerns, both with the article itself and the BETs process as a whole. The relative efficacy of adrenaline and vasopressin in the management of cardiac arrest is an important subject of relevance to all who work in Emergency Medicine. For this BET to only include those papers directly comparing vasopressin and adrenaline is to...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.