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Evaluation of focussed assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST) by UK emergency physicians
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  • Published on:
    Incidental findings on FAST scanning - a Welcome Bonus

    Dear Editor

    The use of Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) is increasing widespread. The ability to perform a FAST scan is now a core skill required by the curriculum of UK Emergency Medicine Trainees. The use of FAST is, and only should be, used to answer binary “yes/no” questions. The limitations of the study should always be explained to the patient & documented in the notes. No Emergency Phy...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Ultrasound training recommendations

    Dear Editor,

    I read with interest the recently published paper by J Brenchley et al concerning focussed assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST).[1] The authors stated that there is currently no agreed FAST training schedules. However, the Royal College of Radiologist has published ultrasound training recommendations for medical and surgical specialties which includes FAST scanning.[2] The working party include...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Fast in children and other considerations

    Dear Editor,

    This study has proved the importance of focused assessment with sonography in trauma (1) (2) (3) in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. The same could have done for patients who are younger than 15 years and with a history of abdominal trauma and the results are shown to be the same (4).

    The emergency physician sonographer's rate on the quality of the views as good, poor or inadequate for f...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Sample size in sensitivity and specificity

    Dear Editor,

    First of all I would like to thank Dr. Brencley for his useful article about the usage of sonography in patients with abdominal trauma(1).

    However there is an important limitation which was not pointed out in the discussion section. The sample size, 153 patients, was too little to predict the true sensitivity of foccused assesment with sonography in trauma (FAST). In this study there were...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.