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Case of the month: Honey I glued the kids: tissue adhesives are not the same as “superglue”
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  • Published on:
    E-letter in response to 'They're all superglues'

    Sir

    I thank Dr DaCruz for his interest in my article and I agree it is generally safe to apply standard (short chain) superglues to ones fingers without any significant ill effects. However I think Dr DaCruz is mistaken if he believes that when used to repair wounds, even if properly applied, these adhesives do not come into contact to some extent with broken skin. There is good scientific evidence, referenced i...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    They're all superglues

    I've visited this issue before (ref 1) and still remain to be convinced that long-chain superglues are less 'toxic' than short-chain DIY superglues, given that no superglue should ever be placed in a wound. The exothermic and the cyanate components of the argument are also completely overstated; millions get superglue on their fingers everyday and dont feel the heat or keel over with cyanide toxicity!

    I'm afraid...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    It's how you use it!

    Dear Editor,

    The problem is that patients (and untrained health workers) assume that the glue should be used on skin the same way it's used to glue a broken cup: put the glue in the middle and push the edges together. Used this way the outcome is poor with either medicinal-grade or ordinary cyano-acrylate glue.

    Conflicts of Interest:

    I've used superglue to cover my own minor hand laceration...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Small explanation big difference
    • Athar Yasin, Senior Clinical Fellow Emergency Medicine

    Dear Editor,

    I read this interesting case reported by Mr L Cascarini where the father had glued facial laceration of the son with help of a domestic "superglue". I agree with the author that we as emergency care specialist have to be very careful and responsible in using the terms "magic" or "super" glue while treating the patients who attend for the minor injuries. Most of the times the glue is used in childre...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.