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Suspension trauma
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  • Published on:
    Suspension Trauma - Other places where the physiology may apply

    Sirs,

    Following on from the paper on suspension trauma from Caroline Lee and Keith M Porter Suspension trauma Emerg. Med. J., Apr 2007; 24: 237 - 238.

    I have previously worked with rope access teams using both front attachment and rear attachment harnesses and have personally seen some of the physiological changes associated with the concept of suspension trauma. These teams have recounted pre-syncopi...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Suspension trauma can be unrelated to harness use

    Dear Editor,

    As a provider of instruction and advice on this subject to both commercial bodies and the emergency services I agree with the response by Dr Patrick Morgan[1] that the condition certainly exists beyond the theoretical level, but more significantly that it does not require that the patient is suspended in a harness - from the cases I have been informed of it seems that harness wearers are actually i...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Suspension Trauma - Case to prove.

    Dear editor

    I have read with interest the replies to Lee and Porter’s article on suspension trauma. As a mountain rescue doctor I have been involved in the care of an individual with suspected suspension trauma. The patient fell 10 metres vertically onto a 40 degree scree slope, with feet facing down the slope and reluctant to place the pelvis on the ground as it caused an increase in pain in both legs. Paramedi...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Suspension Trauma in UK Climbers?

    Dear Editor,

    Although I do not have any experience of the industrial rope access industry I do have considerable personal experience of rock climbing, general mountaineering and ski mountaineering and a long term interest in mountain medicine over the last 35 years, so it was with interest that I read the paper by Lee and Porter (1) in the EMJ. They suggest that they have never seen a case of suspension trauma...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Suspension Trauma

    Dear Editor,

    Thank you for your article which I found very interesting. I have undertaken some work in this area with a colleague of mine from the, now, South Western Ambulance Service NHS Trust, (Mr. David Halliwell). I was also asked to advise the National Scaffolding and Access Confederation (UK)(NASC) on the formulation of a "Rescue Plan" as required under the Working at Height Regulations. Having researche...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.