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Announcing the launch of a new web-based prehospital rapid sequence induction log for doctors
  1. S Le Clerc,
  2. J Henning,
  3. S Masud
  1. The Great North Air Ambulance, Durham Tees Valley Airport, Durham, UK
  1. Dr S Le Clerc, The Great North Air Ambulance, Durham Tees Valley Airport, Durham, UK drsimonleclerc{at}hotmail.com

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The provision of advanced medical intervention for victims at the “point of injury” is a topic that continues to be widely debated. Of equal controversy is the use of prehospital rapid sequence induction (PRSI). Exponents of the procedure have cited numerous instances where appropriate PRSI has improved survivability and morbidity outcomes for victims, while critics state that evidence of benefit is both anecdotal and countered by studies showing poorer outcome.

Many of the outcomes quoted relate to non-UK studies. Often these are US papers and relate to paramedic intubations which are undertaken utilising sedation only techniques.

Within the UK, PRSI is performed by a significant proportion of prehospital doctors, either as part of an organised BASICS/HEMS (British Association for Immediate Care/Helicopter Emergency Medical Services) scheme or as individual practitioners. To date, however, there has been no attempt to study doctor delivered PRSI across the UK. This new secure web based database has been developed to establish more accurate records regarding the numbers of PRSI being performed across the country, the indications for the procedure and initial patient outcomes where possible. In addition, the site allows individual clinicians to register and access their own procedures for the purposes of RITA (record of in-training assessment) or revalidation. The site is designed to be simple and extremely quick to complete.

We would encourage all clinicians who undertake PRSI to utilise the site. This will allow a more comprehensive review of current UK practice. Retrospective PRSI details would also be welcome. To access the site, email <prsi.online@googlemail.com>, briefly identifying your position; you will then be issued a login name and password.

Footnotes

  • Competing interests: None declared.