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Prehospital emergency care: why training should be compulsory for medical undergraduates
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  • Published on:
    Serious about change

    I agree with Antrum and Ho (EMJ 2015;32:171-172) that formal Pre- Hospital Training should be included in all Undergraduate Medical Curriculums. They will be pleased to hear that a nationwide Faculty of Pre -Hospital Care Undergraduate Committee has been set-up, aiming to springboard ideas and information about events, funding and training in pre-hospital care, to all healthcare students. Antrum and Ho quite rightly realis...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    ANTRUM AND HO (EMJ 2015;32:171-172)

    Dear Editor

    ANTRUM AND HO (EMJ 2015;32:171-172)

    Antrum and Ho (EMJ 2015;32:171-172) identify an important issue in identifying the deficiency in medical education due to the lack of formal training in pre-hospital medical care at most medical schools in the UK.

    There are obvious benefits of increasing the number of trained professionals able to provide pre-hospital care it is important that all medical gradua...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re:Prehospital care is not for amateurs

    The authors thank Dr Clayton for her comments.

    However, they point out that her critique of their paper is largely inconsistent with what was actually written and can only assume a misunderstanding of the article.

    The article does not state, nor even imply, that the GMC require students to provide expert or definitive care as she asserted in her response. Indeed the article talks about basic skills an...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Prehospital care is not for amateurs

    The very fact that the author has written this article at all demonstrates to me a profound lack of understanding on his part of the complexities of prehospital care.

    Firstly, the obligation mentioned by the GMC to help victims of accidents is not a requirement to provide expert or definitive care - it is simply a moral duty to provide what help one can given ones own skill set and available resources. As the...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.