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‘The (second) year of first aid’: a 15-month follow-up after a 3-day first aid programme
  1. Bálint Bánfai1,
  2. Attila Pandur1,
  3. Bence Schiszler1,
  4. Emese Pek2,
  5. Balazs Radnai1,
  6. Henrietta Csonka3,
  7. József Betlehem2
  1. 1 University of Pécs Faculty of Health Sciences Institute of Emergency Care and Pedagogy of Health, Pecs, Hungary
  2. 2 University of Pécs Faculty of Health Sciences Institute of Emergency Care and Pedagogy of Health, Pécs, Hungary
  3. 3 University of Pécs Faculty of Health Sciences Institute of Emergency Care and Pedagogy of Health, Pécs, Hungary
  1. Correspondence to Dr Bálint Bánfai, University of Pécs Faculty of Health Sciences Institute of Emergency Care and Pedagogy of Health, 7621 Pécs, Vörösmarty u. 4., Hungary; balint.banfai{at}etk.pte.hu

Abstract

Aim First aid education in early childhood can be an effective method to increase the number of trained bystanders. Our aim was to evaluate the long-term effects of a 3-day first aid programme for all primary school-age groups (7–14 years old).

Methods This study was a 15-month follow-up of our previous investigation. Five-hundred and twenty-four primary school children were involved in this study. Measurements were made on the following topics: adult basic life support, using an automated external defibrillator (AED), handling an unconscious patient, managing bleeding and calling the ambulance. Data collection was made with a self-made questionnaire and skill test.

Results Knowledge and skills were significantly higher after 15 months than before training (p<0.01). However, these results were significantly worse than immediately and 4 months after training (p<0.01). Based on the questionnaire, more than three-quarters knew the emergency phone number 15 months after training. Approximately two-thirds of the children could use the correct hand position in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the correct compression-ventilation ratio and an AED, and half of them could perform correct recovery position at 15 months. Correct assessment of breathing was similar in a situation game than before training. Self-efficacy improved significantly after training (p<0.01) and remained improved after 4 and 15 months when compared with before training (p<0.01).

Conclusion Participants could remember some aspects of first aid long term. However, knowledge and skills had declined after 15 months, so refresher training would be recommended. Self-efficacy towards first aid improved after training and remained high after 15 months.

  • education
  • resuscitation
  • first responders
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Footnotes

  • Contributors BB and JB contributed to study conception and design, data collection, interpretation and preparation of the manuscript. AP, BS and EP contributed to interpretation of data and revision of the manuscript. HC and BR contributed to study design and revision of the manuscript. All authors have read and approved the manuscript for publication.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval Research approval was obtained from the Doctoral and Habilitation Council of the University of Pécs (Hungary) on 25 June 2014 (approval no: EDHT 1004-6/2014). The participants, their parents and teachers received written and oral information prior to study commencement. They were informed of their right to withdraw at any time with no personal consequences. The children’s parents gave written informed consent before their child entered the study.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

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