eLetters

835 e-Letters

  • Emergency Medicine:a name change is one issue-acceptance is another
    Alan O'Connor
    Dear Editor

    While I agree that the specialty in the UK should move to using the title "Emergency Medicine" I would council that it may be difficult to gain acceptance of the name amongst the wider community - both medical and non- medical.

    Here in Australia, the specialty has been officially named "Emergency Medicine" since the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine was incorporated in 1984. However, this mes...

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  • Re: The diagnosis of tuberculosis is difficult to verify
    MC Yuen
    Dear Editor,

    We thank Dr. T. Ho for his comment on our article reporting a young patient with tuberculous osteomyelitis [1]. We wrote the article from the perspective of emergency medicine. Although polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a good adjunct to microbiological culture for diagnosing mycobacterium tuberculosis, it is not available to the majority of emergency physicians in Hong Kong. Nonetheless, we should discuss it b...

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  • The diagnosis of tuberculosis is difficult to verify
    T Ho
    Dear Editor,

    Yuen and Tung describe a case of tuberculous osteomyelitis of the foot [1] and the potential difficulties in making the diagnosis. The authors were fortunate enough to have typical histological biopsy findings which subsequently cultured Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB), providing diagnostic confirmation and estimations of sensitivities. However, in many instances, the diagnosis of tuberculosis is difficult to ve...

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  • Re: What should be clearcut has somehow been usurped
    C Reid
    Dear Editor

    We are delighted that our paper [1] has stimulated a response from overseas colleagues, who have shared with us some Australasian opinions.

    Whilst we agree that adopting the term 'emergency medicine' would bring us into line with international standard terminology, the fact remains that 'accident and emergency' appeals to many, and debate will continue as long as practice between and within United Kingdom...

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  • What should be clearcut has somehow been usurped
    Daniel Fatovich
    Dear Editor,

    The paper on Emergency Medicine terminology by Reid and Chan [1] has stimulated me to write this letter. As an Australian emergency physician who works in a Department of Emergency Medicine, I view the debate on the naming of our specialty in the United Kingdom with some bewilderment and concern. What should be clearcut has somehow been usurped.

    In October 1991, the International Federation of Emergenc...

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  • Blue calls - analysis of patient outcome with matched controls is needed
    Peter Leman

    Dear Editor

    Brown and Warwick [1] have published an interesting descriptive study of 'blue calls' made to a single inner city hospital over a 3 month period in 1998. They state that their aim was to determine whether the current system results in inappropriate deployment of hospital staff. However, the results in the published paper do not show whether any of the patients who arrived with a pre-hospital warning ha...

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  • The author replies
    Stephen Bush

    Editor,

    I thank Drs McIlwee and Jenkins both for their interest in this topic and for their detailed LAT recipe. The sharing of such information and experience is the key to enhancing UK knowledge of this technique's effectiveness. I note that their practical experience with LAT was first gained in North America.

    I agree that there are several non-cocaine containing agents which have been reported wit...

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  • A formulation for topical anaesthetic
    Alister Mc Ilwee

    We note with interest the letter by Bush and his final sentence " If an agent without cocaine was shown to have similar efficacy to TAC (Tetracaine, Adrenaline, and Cocaine), it may allow more widespread use of topical anaesthesia (TA) in the UK." [1]

    There are several agents which are at least as efficacious as TAC. The following agents do not contain cocaine: LAT (Lidocaine, Adrenaline and Tetracaine) [2,3], E...

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  • Authors reply
    F Andrew I Riordan
    Dear Editor,

    I was interested to read Dr de Andrade Nishioka’s letter. He wonders which interventions we should focus on to decrease the mortality from meningococcal disease. In a review of deaths from meningococcal disease, the most frequent and lengthy delays were parents not recognising that their child was seriously ill and doctors failing to make the diagnosis [1]. We therefore need to improve both of these. Early...

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  • Response to Brooks, Sakr, and Dugdale
    A M Leaman
    Dear Editor,

    Thank you for giving me an opportunity to respond to the correspondence concerning my article on minor injury units [1].

    Dugdale and Sakr make so many points that it is difficult to keep my response brief. However, neither of them deny my main concern which is that thousands of minor injury patients are being treated by nurses who had no nationally recognised training and who themselves decide what condi...

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